• Shopping Cart

    Your shopping cart is empty
    Visit the shop

  • BLOG

    POPULAR

    Category Archives: guest blog

    Posted on

    Meeting deadlines with kids underfoot

    meeting-deadlines-with-kids-underfoot-by-jasmine-mansbridge

    By Jasmine Mansbridge

    Picasso once said that; “our goals can only be reached through the vehicle of a plan, in which we must fervently believe, and upon which we must vigorously act. There is no other route to success”. I don’t imagine Picasso frantically making kids lunches, rushing to get out the door by eight in the morning, so he could then get back to his studio to paint in a three hour time frame, but I do like this quote as there were never truer words spoken. Basically if you add raising children to any plan that’s when the challenges truly begin.

    Deadline stress is unavoidable and it seems that kids have inbuilt sensors which make them difficult when you least want them to be. So considering how to best manage your family as well as your creative work commitments will help you achieve maximum output with minimal stress.

    I am a painter and a mother of four children, aged 3 to 17 years of age (with a baby due any day). So I have a broad range of needs to work around. I try and avoid overloading myself with commitments, but when an important date looms (for me that is usually an exhibition), there are things I do to make life easier for myself and my family.

    I don’t recommend making a life out of living this way though. Seasons of work, and then rest, benefit everybody in a family. The wheels would come off my wagon if I did the things I am about to suggest all of the time. But, here goes: some things that work for me when facing deadlines with my business.

    photo-88

    Simplify your wardrobe.

    Get a “uniform”. Mine for a while now has been black converse shoes, jeans and simple T shirts. I just add a jacket or scarf if its cold. This means dressing requires little thought in the mornings and I can get ready in about ten minutes. I save dressing the way I want for weekends and when I am going somewhere “nice”! This also goes for hair, whats happening up there? If it takes you a half hour to dry and straighten it, maybe try a messy bun when you’re flat out. You don’t have to look unkempt, but streamlining your weekday wear will ease you into a busy day and give you time for other stuff.

    Plan simple food.

    I generally think about food for the week on a Sunday afternoon. Although I am not a menu planning/spreadsheet kind of girl, a little thought and a quick shop will make a big difference to your meal time stress levels for the week. When I mean simple food, I mean things such as one pot dinners like roasts and pastas. Children can get involved in making food which is also a great help. Lazy meals like soups with bread or slow cooked meals means you can put them on and forget about them until its time to eat.

    photo-89

     

    Fill the fridge with fresh, easy to use ingredients.

    When it comes to kids snacks, I cut back on baking and other foods that are time consuming to make. Instead I buy tubs of natural yoghurt and hommus, then for easy morning and afternoon teas I just have to add fruit or muesli to the yoghurt, or savoury biscuits, carrots and celery to the hommus. This keeps everyone full and healthy, without lots of preparation. It will stop you having to resort to the convenience of take away and it also saves money.

    Negotiate with your partner/husband to share or take over bedtime and other household duties.

    For example, when I am busy painting I can get so much more done if I can at least share the kids bedtime routine. If I can start working straight after dinner at night, I find that I have a lot more energy to paint and I am a lot more productive. If I wait until the kids are down for the night, I find it so much harder to restart my energy flow. Also, negotiate for weekend working time. My husband is really good at helping me get over the line when I am busy, but it does take good communication and verbalising your needs for this to happen. It is also about give and take, so be prepared for some compromise. When my husband is busy with his own work, I do of course try and pick up the slack and do the same for him.

    Have an “in bed” and “out of bed” time for yourself!

    When I am painting late into the night, I usually get a second wind at about eleven o’clock, even though I might have been exhausted at nine. So, I make myself go to bed by 12:30pm. The times I have broken this rule and stayed up half the night, I have paid for it by being very weary the next day and then I am not able to work the following night. I really have to be out of bed by seven to get everyone ready for school and to be prepared for the day ahead, so sleeping in is an impossibility. I seem to be able to function pretty well on seven or so hours sleep, so my set hours work for me, (though its still a commitment to work long hours). Work out what works for you and try to stick to it. To keep a bit of balance, I usually give myself a night off on a weekend, to watch a movie or do something with my husband.

    Get a cleaner in on a regular basis, at least once a fortnight if you can.

    If you have a busy life, this is probably my number one de-stressing tip! Having a cleaner won’t mean you don’t have to do housework, but it does ease the pressure on your household while you go AWOL into your creative workaholic zone. If you are worried about the cost of a cleaner, try tallying what you might spend on coffee, wine, or other extras, and all of a sudden a cleaner may seem cheap, (but be warned they are equally addictive).

    Source some kind of childcare.

    Childcare is a tough one I know, and it can be expensive, especially if your not making any money up front from your creative work. I have had different help at different times. My mother in law is wonderful and has had my youngest children many times when I have a deadline to meet. But mostly I have had to just work with my kids around (not ideal, but necessary at times). I have also paid my teenage children’s friends and other friends to play with and entertain my small children, (picnics or games in the back yard work for a couple of hours). I have used occasional childcare, in the form of two hour sessions available at my local gym. It does take focus to switch in and out of creative mode so quickly and work when you have limited time or you are sharing your head space, but it is better than no time to work at all.

    Try and find creative ways to let your children work alongside of you, some of the time.

    In my studio I have a couple of tubs of basic crafting materials. Pencils, colouring books, glue etc… My children don’t find me painting that exciting, as they are used to seeing me do it on a daily basis. This means they are happy to take up a corner (or half the studio) with their activities while I paint. Age is obviously a consideration, but stick some tunes on and you might get an hour or so of work done and they will get to use their own imaginations. It does take patience and tolerance and a certain kind of head space to make this work for you. If you have a deadline though, a couple of hours will be invaluable. If you are stuck for ideas, the internet is full of age appropriate kids activities, so get Googling!

    photo-93

    Don’t take it all to seriously.

    This is my last tip, and its because it’s probably the most important. While on the one hand it takes a hell of an effort and consistent commitment to pursue creative success and also raise a happy family, on the other hand , your family will always be your greatest measure of success. So, if you’re having a day when you feel like you are banging your head against a wall and getting nowhere, or if you feel tired, frustrated and worn out, then the best thing you can probably do it take a deep breath, call a friend and head to the park or the beach, or somewhere that is not at home or your studio for a few hours! When I do do this I come home recharged and refreshed, my tank full again. Remember being a creative person should be fun! (at least most of the time).

    Jasmine Mansbridge is a painter and mum to four (almost five) kids. She regularly blogs about the intersection of creative work and family life at www.jasminemansbridge.com, and you can also find her on Instagram @jasminemansbridge.

    {All photos by Jasmine Mansbridge}


    Posted by: Tess McCabe
    Categories: business tips, guest blog, women in art | Comments Off
    Posted on

    Studio visit: Kate Pascoe Squires of Kate & Kate

    By Amanda Fuller

    Kate & Kate is run by Kate, and well, Kate. Not only do the two share a name, they are also business partners, sisters-in-law and best friends and they share a passion for blankets!

    Launched almost one year ago, Kate & Kate offers beautiful blankets knitted from super-soft, breathable cotton. The business is run from the Kates’ homes in Melbourne and Sydney.

    Recently, I had the privilege to visit Kate Pascoe Squires in her Sydney home studio which was formerly an architects office. The space, which Kate shares with her husband, is filled with light and has a lovely view over the rooftops of her Bondi neighbourhood. She shares more with us below.

    What is your background? How did you arrive at Kate & Kate?

    I studied public relations at RMIT University in Melbourne and jumped straight into the industry. I focused on all the fun stuff – food, restaurants, providores, wine, spirits. You get the idea. It wasn’t until I had my second child that I realised the PR lifestyle was just too much of a juggle for me. I was definitely ready for change. I wanted to do something creative, something tangible. I just can’t believe that blankets were my calling!

    (The other) Kate’s background is fashion. She has worked across all sectors of the industry – retail, production, design and wardrobe, she did it all. Like me, she realised once her first son was born, that working in wardrobe was not going to work. The hours were ridiculous.

    We were both looking into separate individual pursuits when we came across our manufacturers. Within half an hour, it was decided – we would go into business together and blankets would be our thing.

    Kate & Kate Studio Visit Interview Creative Womens Circle 2

    What do you think makes for a creative working space?

    Both of us do most of our work from our home offices. Our work and personal lives are so intertwined and our work spaces really reflect this. We have to work to keep creative, but that’s what makes this whole thing so amazing.

    We do find that getting away together really boosts our creativity. We don’t get to do it as much as we’d like, but we take what we can get! Our trip to India at the start of the year was incredibly inspiring – we are still working on designs based on the inspiration we pulled from that trip. Where to next? I’m saying New York… but we’ll see.

    Kate & Kate Studio Visit Interview Creative Womens Circle 7

    Kate & Kate Studio Visit Interview Creative Womens Circle 3

    Describe a typical day for you.

    Wake up or get woken. Serious Instagram scrolling. Emails. Mental plan for the day ahead. Corral the kids downstairs. Husband too. Shower. Vortex of getting kids dressed, serving breakfast, school lunches, packing bag, screaming for everyone to get out of the house and school drop offs. More emails. Design. Inspiration. Liaison with our manufacturers, retailers, stylists, media. Phone calls. Emails. Pilates. Kids, food, wine.  And repeat!

    You have just launched the Kate & Kate baby range – what lead to this?

    We had customers and retailers asking for them! The fact that Kate was pregnant at the time we were designing didn’t have anything to do with it – ha ha ha!  We like to design with flexibility in mind, so our baby range still has a fairly adult aesthetic and is slightly oversized, so the blanket can be used as a throw over a chair or basket down the track.  We don’t want anyone purchasing a Kate & Kate item and it becoming redundant.

    Kate & Kate Studio Visit Interview Creative Womens Circle 6

    Kate & Kate Studio Visit Interview Creative Womens Circle 4

    What are your favourite Kate & Kate products right now?

    I’m totally mad for neutrals right now – actually, always. The Sea Tangle blanket in snow white and silver birch is my favourite from the current collection. Kate is loving The Kiss baby blanket in the blue grotto… but it sold out before she could get her hands on one!

    What inspires the Kate & Kate aesthetic?

    We find inspiration everywhere.  For colour, we seek inspiration from the catwalks.  Style.com really gets our creativity flowing. We can trawl for days searching for that perfect colour combination. For design, we seek inspiration in the everyday. The shape of a building, the fold of an envelope, a bunch of shadows… these are all things that have inspired our recent designs. We love getting a peek into other people’s everyday via Instagram too – if that doesn’t get you inspired, I don’t know what will.

    Kate & Kate Studio Visit Interview Creative Womens Circle 1

    Thank you Kate for welcoming me into your space to get a peek behind-the-scenes of Kate & Kate and where your inspiration comes from. Thank you also for sharing with us about yourself, your partner-in-design and your utterly gorgeous blankets! Discover the on-trend, luxurious range for yourself at the Kate & Kate website.

    Amanda Fuller is a passionate blogger, avid graphic designer and social media aficionado who has been designing since 2004 and just celebrated her 5th year blogging. Her blog Kaleidoscope is a place of inspiration and beautiful resources for women bloggers and creative business owners. Amanda offers design services such as logo design, blog design and eBook design, helping other women present their passion with style. You can find her on Facebook, Google+ and Instagram @AmandaFuller.

    {All images by Amanda}


    Posted by: Tess McCabe
    Categories: bricks & mortar, guest blog, virtual visit | Comments Off
    Posted on

    8 Tips for Market Stall Success

    8-tips-for-market-stall-success530

    By Monica Ng

    You open your inbox and you see a new email from the market you’ve recently applied to.

    “Congratulations! Your application was successful!”

    You ogle at this sentence and you begin to buzz with excitement. You do a happy dance, Elaine Benes style to celebrate your success and show off your rad moves to the four walls of the room you’re sitting in. Yaaay!

    My jewellery shop, Geometric Skies has participated in a variety of showcases and markets including some specialty designer markets such as the Sydney Finders Keepers, the Etsy Interactive Exhibition at the Fracture Gallery in Federation Square as part of the L’Oreal Melbourne Fashion Festival, RAW Artists’ first Sydney showcase, The Makery and the fashion markets at Bondi Beach and Kirribilli.

    I started from scratch as a complete newbie and through these experiences over the past year, I’ve gained some insight and learned some tricks that may help set up your market day for success. Regardless of whether it’s your first time, or if you’re a seasoned stallholder, here are a few pointers to help you prepare for your next event.

    Think about your display
    Dedicate some time to how you want to set out your work. This is especially important if there’ll be a lot of other stallholders selling similar types of items, like jewellery. I’ve seen a lot of jewellery designers at markets lay their pieces flat on tables, which may make it more difficult for customers walking by to see the work from afar.

    Ask yourself:

    How can your display be different to other stallholders?
    Can you arrange it at different levels? Use busts? Racks? Trees?
    Will you be buying these props or will you construct them?
    What materials will they be made from?
    What do these materials say about your brand?

    Try to be consistent and use the same materials to display your goods, as this gives your shop a cleaner and more cohesive look.

    Also, consider using a mannequin. I use a half body mannequin, so customers can see from afar how some of my more adventurous pieces like ‘The Lily body chain’ looks and fits. Often, this draws in customers who wander up to my shop to have a closer look and to ‘ooh’ and ‘ahh’.

    How will you display your shop’s logo? Laser cut on acrylic, wood or another material? Painted or printed on canvas? Wooden or metal letters? Sounds like a fun DIY activity!

    Will you be bringing your own table or will you hire one? If you’re using a tablecloth, make sure it’s wrinkle free.

    monica-ng-market-stall-success-2

    Bring marketing materials

    What if the customer doesn’t buy today, but wanted to show their friend first before making a decision? How will they ever find your work again? What if they do buy, and want to share your other work with their friends and family?

    Be sure to bring business cards, postcards, a mailing list sign up sheet, branded packaging, or an iPad with photos of your work and a slideshow of press clippings. These are all great items to promote your shop. If you need help designing these, why not ask your friends and family to see if there’s someone who can help you?

    Printing business cards doesn’t have to be expensive as there are some inexpensive online options like Moo, Vistaprint, or Print Together where you simply upload your design, and they’ll print it and post it straight to you.

    Also, prior to the event, remember to publicise it! Speaking of publicity…

    Tell everyone about your event!
    Tell your friends, family and colleagues. Even if you think they won’t ever buy from you, they may forward the news of your event to people who will. Let your existing customers know too!

    Publicise your event through different channels such as your blog, word of mouth, newsletter and social media.

    Be a “yes” person and set up future sales
    Is the size too big, too small, too short or too long for your customer? Offer the option for customisation.

    At the market, consider offering a free shipping or discount coupon to customers for their next purchase.

    Running a competition can help direct traffic and add new followers to your blog, mailing list and social media channels. Why not try partnering up with a blogger to help increase your competition’s outreach?

    Be prepared for all weather conditions
    If the market is outdoors, bring warm clothes, hat, sunblock, snacks/drinks and a chair to keep you going during the day. If business is super busy and you can’t get duck away to buy some food, at least you have some snacks to keep you going.

    Also, sandbags for your gazebo are a lifesaver (in case it gets windy). I’ve seen some gazebos blow away before and not only is it dangerous to yourself and others, it could also result in property damage. If weather conditions become too dangerous, it’s the organiser’s discretion whether trading can continue. Safety first!

    Pack!
    Pack the night before (or even earlier), to save yourself a freak out the morning of the event. Use the checklist below so you’re not kicking yourself at the event for forgetting something.

    • Stationery/admin: blu-tack, pen, notebook, measuring tape, screwdrivers, drill, receipt book, bull clips, plastic bags, duct or masking tape
    • Sales: Sufficient change in your float, credit card machine, mobile phone, phone charger
    • Furniture and accessories: tables, chairs, trolley, gazebo, sand bags
    • Props/display: Stands, mannequins, table cloth, signage, business card holder + extra business cards, price tags, mailing list sign up sheet, packaging
    • Enough stock to sell (always better to take more, than less)
    • Personal: Mini first aid kit, snacks/drinks, hat, sunblock, warm clothes, umbrella

    Network with other stallholders
    Get to know your neighbours and become friends! Gather business cards so you can remain in contact after the event. You never know when a collaboration opportunity might pop up and you’ll be kicking yourself for not getting their contact details.

    Have fun

    Sometimes business is so crazy, before you know it you’ve sold out of everything. Congratulations! On other days, business may not be as well as you hoped it would be. Perhaps it’ll pick up later on in the day or the next person that stops will shop up a storm. Stay positive and enjoy the experience.

    Good luck!

    monica-ng-market-stall-success-1

    Monica Ng left her accounting career at the end of 2013 and began studying a two-year jewellery and object design diploma at the Design Centre, Enmore in 2014. She blogs at www.geometricskies.wordpress.com and you can also find her on Instagram @geometric_skies, www.facebook.com/geometricskies, and her Etsy shop


    Posted by: Tess McCabe
    Categories: business tips, guest blog, my advice, resource | Comments Off
    Posted on

    What is content marketing and why is it important for your creative business?

    By Domini Marshall

    what-is-content-marketing-by-domini-marshall1

    There are so many definitions for ‘content marketing’ out there. The Content Marketing Institute defines it as:

    A marketing technique of creating and distributing valuable, relevant and consistent content to attract and acquire a clearly defined audience – with the objective of driving profitable customer action.

    That sounds lovely and professional and yes, it defines the process of content marketing well. It is about creating valuable, relevant and consistent content for your customers with the objective of gaining greater conversion, revenue and other positive results.

    In its very simplest terms, however, I like to think of content marketing as storytelling.

    Before we delve in, let’s talk about the term content marketing a little more. With content marketing, your content comes first and channels come second.

    What is content?

    Content encompasses anything you create to tell your brand story. It’s the story itself. Think engaging blog posts, compelling product copy, beautiful imagery, videos, infographics and so much more.

    What are channels?

    Channels are where and how you share that content. So, a blog is a channel. Social media, videos, emails and printed catalogues are all channels. With content marketing, content comes first, channels come second. The importance is on creating engaging and valuable content for your audience. Then, once you have that content, you can decide where and how you’re going to share it with the world. Ultimately, it’s about the customer experience, not just a product or service at the end of the line.

    Amy Crawford from The Holistic Ingredient does an amazing job at creating consistent content across her channels. With regular emails, eBooks, social media posts, recipes and more, she inspires her audience to live a life of wellbeing.

    Amy Crawford from The Holistic Ingredient does an amazing job at creating consistent content across her channels. With regular emails, eBooks, social media posts, recipes and more, she inspires her audience to live a life of wellbeing.

    Why is content marketing so great?

    The reason why content marketing has become so popular is that it offers brands and businesses a way to connect with consumers that is different to traditional advertising methods, and that has a proven track record of resulting in greater engagement, which builds greater brand equity and which translates to greater conversion.

    Great content marketing:

    • connects with your customers – connect is the important word here
    • takes them on a brand experience
    • builds brand authority – which means consumers look to your brand for relevant information on specific topics and which encourages positive word of mouth marketing for your brand
    • improves SEO (search engine optimisation) – Google rewards quality content with higher rankings which means your site will appear higher in search results
    • increases the time spent on your site through greater engagement which, in turn, increases conversion and revenue.

    Which leads us to storytelling.

    Why storytelling?

    At the core of all storytelling is the desire to connect. If content marketing is all about connection, then it’s also all about storytelling.

    We all have a story. We all crave connection. When someone tells us their story and their reason for being, we naturally engage with it because we have one too. If you find a brand that has a story that you find compelling and a message that is inspiring, it’s likely you’ll support that brand and share your love for it with others.

    Fete Press make the most of all their beautiful content. You can try out delicious recipes, find party and food inspiration in their online gallery and enjoy their consistent social media posts on Instagram and Pinterest.

    Fete Press make the most of all their beautiful content. You can try out delicious recipes, find party and food inspiration in their online gallery and enjoy their consistent social media posts on Instagram and Pinterest.

    What’s your story?

    In your creative business, what’s your reason for being? What is it about what you do that you absolutely love? What gets you up and out of bed each day? What inspires you? Start here.

    Think about those questions. What are your answers? Do you share them with your community often? Do your customers know your story? How are you going to communicate your passion and inspiration with them?

    For me, I love learning. I love that moment when I’m reading a book, hearing someone speak or watching a film and I lose myself.  I’m totally involved in the experience and my emotions take over. I feel inspired and afraid and vulnerable all at once.  I crave the moment that someone’s words or creations alter my way of looking at something and I want to create things that do that too.

    In order to connect with people you have to open yourself up to being vulnerable and sometimes that means taking a risk, but if you tell your story with conviction, courage and passion, you’ll discover a world of people who want to know more. In that story (in you) is all the compelling content you could ever want or need.

    Get organised, throw it in a content calendar and go!

    If you’re not already, use a content calendar. Organise all those amazing, wonderful, inspiring ideas that are bubbling away now and get them down on paper. Create something simple in a word or excel doc and plan ahead.

    Once you’ve got it down you can start thinking about where you want to share it. Start a blog. Create a YouTube channel. Sign up to Instagram, Pinterest or Twitter. You choose. Once you’ve got your story, once you’ve got the content, you can decide on your channels.

    Just remember that in storytelling there needs to be a listener or reader too. So, have a conversation with your audience. Share your story and ask for theirs too. Own it, embrace it, and listen to what others have to say. It’s there that you’ll find connection and plenty of ideas for content too.

    Domini Marshall is a freelance writer living in Melbourne. A love for great stories and connection inspires her work for brands and businesses in copywriting, content creation and social media. A creative at heart, she also writes short fiction and screenplays and you can find her sharing inspiration and more on Instagram and Pinterest

    (Photo credit: josemanuelerre via photopin cc)

    Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...
    Posted by: Tess McCabe
    Categories: business tips, guest blog, what's new in social media, women who write | Comments Off